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  Medical prescription  
  A prescription is a health-care program implemented by a physician or other medical practitioner in the form of instructions that govern the plan of care for an individual patient.(Belknap 2008)
Prescriptions may include orders to be performed by a patient, caretaker, nurse, pharmacist or other therapist. Commonly, the term prescription is used to mean an order to take certain medications. Prescriptions have legal implications, as they may indicate that the prescriber takes responsibility for the clinical care of the patient and in particular for monitoring efficacy and safety. As medications have increasingly become pre–packaged manufactured products and medical practice has become more complex, the scope of meaning of the term "prescription" has broadened to also include clinical assessments, laboratory tests, and imaging studies relevant to optimizing the safety or efficacy.
 
     
  Format and definition  
 

Prescriptions are handwritten on preprinted prescription forms that are assembled into pads, or alternatively printed onto similar forms using a computer printer. Preprinted on the form is text that identifies the document as a prescription, the name and address of the prescribing provider and any other legal requirement such as a registration number (e.g. DEA Number in the United States). Unique for each prescription is the name of the patient. In the United Kingdom the patient's name and address must also be recorded. Each prescription is dated and some jurisdictions may place a time limit on the prescription (UMCG). There is the specific "recipe" of the medication and the directions for taking it.

Rx is a symbol meaning "prescription". It is sometimes transliterated as "Rx" or just "Rx". There are various theories about the origin of this symbol - some note its similarity to the Eye of Horus( Eye of Horus, Eye of Ra (Udjat, Wedjat)) (First recorded incidence of the pharmaceutical sign), others to the ancient symbol for Jupiter, both gods whose protection may have been sought in medical contexts. Alternatively, it may be intended as an abbreviation of the Latin "recipe" (Endomail.com), the imperative form of "recipere", "to take or take thus"(Merriam-webster.com), and it is quite possible that more than one of these factors influenced its form. Literally, "Recipe" means simply "Take...." and when a medical practitioner writes a prescription beginning with "Rx", he or she is completing the command. This was probably originally directed at the pharmacist who needed to take a certain amount of each ingredient to compound the medicine, rather than at the patient who must "take" the medicine, in the sense of consuming it. The word "prescription" can be decomposed into "pre" and "script" and literally means, "to write before" a drug can be prepared. Those within the industry will often call prescriptions simply "scripts". Another theory exists that the "Rx" may have originally been a "Px", where the "P" is short for "pre", and the "x" is short for "script".

 
     
 
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  A to Z Prescription Drug List  
  Drug List from A to Z  
     
  About Prescription Drug 24.com  
  Welcome to the Prescription-Drug-24.com! Prescription Drug 24.com is a New Medical resource.Our mission - “We wants to care about your health” that's why we have a lot information about many prescription drugs like Description, Interactions and Side effects.  
     
  What does it mean - Prescription Drugs?  
  A prescription drug is a licensed medicine that is regulated by legislation to require a prescription before it can be obtained. The term is used to distinguish it from over the counter drugs which can be obtained without a prescription. Different jurisdictions have different definitions of what constitutes a prescription drug.  
     
  Regulation of therapeutic goods in the United States  
 

In the United States, the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act defines what requires a prescription. Prescription drugs are generally authorized by veterinarians, dentists, optometrists, and medical practitioners. It is generally required that an MD, DO, PA, OD, DPM, DVM, DDS, or DMD write the prescription; basic-level registered nurses, medical assistants, clinical nurse specialists, nurse anesthetists, and nurse midwives, emergency medical technicians, psychologists, and social workers as examples, do not have the authority to prescribe drugs.

The package insert for a prescription drug contains information about the intended effect of the drug and how it works in the body. It also contains information about side effects, how a patient should take the drug, and cautions for its use, including warnings about allergies.As a general rule, OTC (over the counter) drugs are used to treat conditions not necessarily requiring care from a health care professional and have been proven to meet higher safety standards for self-medication by patients. Often a lower strength of a drug will be approved for OTC use, while higher strengths require a prescription to be obtained; a notable case is ibuprofen, which has been widely available as an OTC pain killer since the mid-1980s but is still available by prescription in doses up to four times the OTC dose for use in cases of severe pain not adequately controlled by the lower, strength.

In the United States, the term "prescription drug" is most commonly used, but they are also called Rx-only drugs or legend drugs, after the Federal and State laws which mandate that all such drugs bear a "legend" prohibiting sale without a prescription; though more complex legends have been used, on most original drug packaging today the legend simply says "Rx only". In the United Kingdom, they are referred to as Prescription Only Medicine. Physicians may legally prescribe drugs for uses other than those specified in the FDA approval; this is known as off-label use. Drug companies may not promote or market drugs for off-label uses.

 
     
  Types of medications (type of pharmacotherapy)  
 

For the gastrointestinal tract (digestive system): Upper digestive tract: antacids, reflux suppressants, antiflatulents, antidopaminergics, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), H2-receptor antagonistss, cytoprotectants, prostaglandin analogues.
Lower digestive tract: laxatives, antispasmodics, antidiarrhoeals, bile acid sequestrants, opioid...gatartic drugs

For the cardiovascular system:
General: β-receptor blockers ("beta blockers"), calcium channel blockers, diuretics, cardiac glycosides, antiarrhythmics, nitrate, antianginals, vasoconstrictors, vasodilators, peripheral activators
Affecting blood pressure (antihypertensive drugs): ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, α blockers
Coagulation: anticoagulants, heparin, antiplatelet drugs, fibrinolytics, anti-hemophilic factors, haemostatic drugs
Atherosclerosis/cholesterol inhibitors: hypolipidaemic agents, statins.

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  Ritalin SR 20mg - C18A 16  
  Drugs is ...  
  A drug, broadly speaking, is any substance that, when absorbed into the body of a living organism, alters normal bodily function. (World Health Organization. (1969). WHO Expert Committee on Drug Dependence. Sixteenth report (Technical report series. No.407)Geneva:World Health Organization).
There is no single, precise definition, as there are different meanings in drug control law, government regulations, medicine, and colloquial usage.
(Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1), Random House, Inc., via dictionary.com. Retrieved on 20 September 2007)
 
     
  Drugs Classification  
  Medications can be classified in various ways,(www.epgonline.org) such as by chemical properties, mode or route of administration, biological system affected, or therapeutic effects. An elaborate and widely used classification system is the ATC system (Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System). The World Health Organization keeps a list of essential medicines.

    Classification:
  • Antipyretics: reducing fever (pyrexia/pyresis)
  • Analgesics: reducing pain (painkillers)
  • Antimalarial drugs: treating malaria
  • Antibiotics: inhibiting germ growth
  • Antiseptics: prevention of germ growth near burns, cuts and wounds
 
     
  Did You Know Where Rx Came From?  
 

Interesting story about Rx symbols - "For years i saw the symbol Rx and used it without knowing what it meant or symbolized. Finally, I stumbled upon the meaning of it and took note. The symbol Rx is derived from the major lines in the symbol of the Eye of Horus. Horus was an Egyptian god, the god of Nekhen, a village in Egypt, and god of the sky, of light, and of goodness. He was the son of Isis, the nature goddess, and Osiris, the god of the underworld. Osiris was murdered by his evil brother Seth, the god of darkness and evil. Horus sought to avenge his father’s death by challenging his uncle Seth to a fight. Seth cut out Horus’s eye, but Thoth, a god associated with wisdom and compassion, magically restored the eye. Horus did defeat Seth, finally. Horus’s eye, also called the wadjet eye, became a symbol for health. The Egyptians considered it a symbol of good and restored health.
The symbol was passed along through the ages. As William Osler wrote in 1910, “In a cursive form it is found in mediaeval translations of the works of Ptolemy the astrologer, as the sign of the planet Jupiter. As such it was placed upon horoscopes and upon formula containing drugs made for administration to the body, so that the harmful properties of these drugs might be removed under the influence of the lucky planet.”
There is another theory of Rx’s origin. In that version, Rx is an abbreviation for the Latin word recipere, which means “take” or “take thus.” Long ago, this would not have been a direction to a patient but to a pharmacist, preceding the physician’s “recipe” for preparing a medication.
That may be, but the shape of the symbol is a strong argument in favor of the Eye of Horus as its origin.
If you look closely at the major lines of the eye of Horus, you can see the elements of the symbol Rx."

 
     
     
 
 
 
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